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The latest news from BUIRA

The Social Organization of Ideas in Employment Relations, Professor Marco Hauptmeier (Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University)

Date: Tuesday 7 December 2021

Time: 12:30 – 14:00 GMT

Venue: This seminar will take place in zoom

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-social-organization-of-ideas-in-employment-relations-tickets-211744713137

Abstract

This article compares how the United States and Germany deregulated labour markets between the 1980s and 2010s in response to the rise of neoliberalism. Building on literature with a focus on ideas and national knowledge regimes, the authors argue that the trajectories of labour market deregulation across the two countries are explained by the distinct social organization of ideas. The latter refers to the actors and institutions involved in the production and dissemination of ideas (including think tanks and public research institutes), their access and ways of communicating to political elites and electorates, levels of shared academic standards across the political divide, and related degrees of competition or cooperation in the production of new knowledge and policy ideas. Moving beyond previous employment relations literature with a focus on institutions and power, the article breaks new theoretical ground by demonstrating how the social organization of ideas is a key intermediary in explaining employment relations change and continuity.

About Professor Marco Hauptmeier

Marco’s research in the area of international and comparative employment relations focuses on collective actors, including labour unions, European Works Councils and employer organisations, inquiring how collective action is possible and results in collaborative advantages. He won an ESRC Future Research Leader grant for a study on UK employer organisations and his current project, funded by the Hans Böckler Foundation, extends this research to the European level, focusing on European employer organisations.

 

23rd November 2021

New Date: BUIRA AGM

British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) Annual General Meeting (AGM)

Due to planned strike action by UCU on Friday December 3, the online BUIRA AGM will now be on Thursday December 9th, 12-1 o’clock.

Join Zoom Meeting

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/89868704910

Meeting ID: 898 6870 4910

Agenda:

  1. Matters arising from last AGM:

- BUIRA Code of Practice

  1. BUIRA Annual Conference 2022, University of Birmingham
  2. BUIRA Steward/Officer reports
  3. BUIRA Study Groups
  4. Other agenda items

-Intersectionality

  1. University of Bristol BUIRA Stewardship (2022-2025). Link here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nszXsRQeB2XhcHgFMnB1Xaz9oRVvTr8X/view?usp=sharing
  2. AOB

Any other agenda items for 5 please send to BUIRA President: t.dobbins@bham.ac.uk

22nd November 2021

The Equal Pay Act 50 Years On: How Labour Governments have dealt with equal pay

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

The Equal Pay Act 50 Years On: How Labour Governments have dealt with equal pay

 

17.00-18.45 Thursday 9th December (through Zoom)

 

The Equal Pay Act (1970) has been with us for fifty years, though it has now been largely superseded by the Equality Act (2010). In this seminar, we analyse its origins and impact industrial relations under the 1974-79 Labour Governments. We then move on to investigate how the New Labour Governments attempted to deal with the persistent gender pay gaps from 1997 onwards, and draw lessons for the present day.

 

For further details and to reserve a place, please e-mail Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk). We’ll send Zoom link a few days before the seminar.
 
Programme:
17.00-17.15: Welcome and introduction: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

17.15 – 17.45: Frances Galt (UWE)

Women’s Industrial Militancy and the Equal Pay Act 1970

During the 1970s, there was an intensification of women-led industrial disputes, particularly in the five-year implementation period following the passing of the Equal Pay Act (EPA) 1970. Through strikes, workplace occupations and demonstrations, women workers demanded equal pay, improved working conditions and union recognition, and resisted redundancy, factory closure and productivity agreements. Between 1972 and 1979 roughly 43 per cent of women-led industrial disputes were for equal pay. The shortcomings of the EPA also galvanised campaigns against workplace gender discrimination, with women union activists extending their demands beyond equal pay to address access to education and training, childcare facilities, and maternity leave. Drawing on the conclusions of my monograph on women’s union activism in the British film and television industries and preliminary findings from my research on equal pay strikes for the AHRC-funded Gender Equalities at Work project, this paper will explore trade union responses to the EPA.

 

17.45 – 18.15: Susan Milner (University of Bath)

Labour market policy regulation and industrial relations in the (New) Labour years: the problem of the gender pay gap

In 2001, the manifesto for Labour's second term included a commitment to address the gender pay gap. The Women and Work Commission was established in 2004 to investigate causes of the gender pay gap and make recommendations, following the Warwick agreement which reflected frustration among trade unions and arguably the breakdown of voluntary pluralism which had characterised Labour's first term. Equal pay was a long-standing trade union demand and had also been adopted as Labour policy. However, although the gender pay gap narrowed slightly after 1997 it still stood at 19.2% by the end of Labour's term of office, and few policy interventions directly addressed it. This paper critically assesses how far Labour's dominant mode of employment policy regulation addressed the gender pay gap, and why. It revisits the 'classic' areas of voluntary pluralism in the early Labour period (national minimum wage, union recognition, and flexible working) and shows that policy on the gender pay gap suffered from uneven attention, as well as leaders' perceptions of cost and difficulty. 

 

18.15 – 18.45: Discussion

*****

Our speakers:

Dr Frances Galt (Research Fellow, UWE Bristol) is author of Women’s Activism Behind the Screens: Trade Unions and Gender Inequality in the British Film and Television Industries (BUP 2020). She currently researches the introduction and implementation of the Equal Pay Act 1970 for the AHRC-funded project Gender Equalities at Work.

 

Professor Susan Milner (Department of Politics, Languages and International Relations, and Institute for Policy Research, University of Bath) currently holds a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship to research policy on women and employment in the New Labour years. She also leads a GW4 research group on gender pay equality.

16th November 2021

BUIRA special webinar: The GMB/Uber deal: implications for industrial relations in the gig economy and beyond

Here is the recording of the BUIRA special webinar on November 11th: https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/rec/share/SZNsYXPpiGC7Q5PBetY_oCrXtGYkE1V5Q3Ub24je3QUYJxOwsf_PhRK9TPxNOnGa.YBtpvdMzuMCducsQ… Passcode: PJ*RHu3$

16th November 2021

BUIRA Annual Conference 2022: Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work

University of Birmingham, June 28th-30th 2022

Plenary Speakers

Tamara Lee (Rutgers University, US): Why race and intersectionality matter for IR.

Paul Edwards (University of Birmingham): How and Where Employment Relations Matter(s)

Linda Clarke (University of Westminster), Béla Galgóczi (European Trade Union Institute), Vera Trappmann (University of Leeds): Why green industrial relations matter(s) for climate emergency.

Conference theme: 

The theme of this year’s conference is Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work.

Keith Sisson (2009, 2020) outlines Why Employment Relations MattersEmployment relations matters is a ten chapter text publicly available under a Creative Commons Licence. It has a double intention reflected in its title: to ensure people are up to date with the matters that the study of employment relations deals with and to explain why they matter. It has two main audiences in mind. First, people who teach and study employment relations. Second, practitioners and policy-makers.

Unsurprisingly, BUIRA has long argued that Employment Relations Matter(s). In ‘What’s The Point of Industrial Relations?’ the message was clear: ‘The agenda of industrial relations research and teaching thus has fundamental moral and practical importance’ than many other fields of study in contemporary business schools (BUIRA 2009, 53).

Employment relations commentators have also recently shown Why Employment Relations Matters. For example, Hodder and Martínez Lucio’s (2021) paper ‘Pandemics, politics, and the resilience of employment relations research’ suggests that the Covid-19 pandemic has appeared to change the public narrative on work and employment, and highlighted the continued relevance and value of employment relations as a field of study. They conclude that the Covid crisis has highlighted the resilience of the field of employment relations, reminding us of its critical relevance to academic and public interest. They outline the challenges faced by academics and practitioners in the field of employment relations to build upon this new found attention to ensure that employment relations issues remain central in terms of research, teaching and public policy.

Why Employment Relations Matters for Democratizing (and Decommodifying) Work has been strongly illustrated in the context of the Coronavirus public health pandemic. The pandemic has highlighted just how vital human work of social (not financial) value is for keeping human life and society functioning. Human workers are not merely commodities or human ‘resources’.

IR/ER and politics of work scholars have been at the forefront and contributed extensively to research and public policy during the pandemic to showcase why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work. To provide just a few illustrative examples: The social value of human labour during Covid (Martinez Lucio and McBride, 2020Winton and Howcroft, 2020); analysis of the furlough/job retention scheme (Stuart et al., 2021); the real living wage and addressing cost of living increases (Dobbins and Prowse, 2021); the effect of Covid on workers’ health and safety in places like call centres (Taylor, 2020).

That said, a clear message that emerged from the 2021 BUIRA conference is that there is scope for our field to extend it’s contribution to vital social matters like intersectionality – the intersection of identities around issues like gender, sexuality, race and class (Lee and Tapia, 2021McBride et al., 2015Moore and Taylor, 2021). Intersectionality is a domain where employment relations does and should matter. There is also potential for work and employment scholars to contribute to thinking and public policy debates on green IR and climate crisis (Clarke and Lipsig-Mummé, 2020).

Evidently, the field of ER/IR has broadened considerably thematically since the early historical focus on collective bargaining and IR institutions and rules. However, it needs to continually adapt and update to address issues arising in the real world of the politics of work. 

Call for Papers

The conference team welcome papers on any sub-theme under the broad theme of Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work. Illustrative examples of sub-themes include:

  • Implications of Coronavirus for the future of work (e.g. flexible working);
  • Green industrial relations, green jobs, climate crisis;
  • Intersectionality, equality, gender, race, class, disability, and IR;
  • New technology, the gig economy and the politics of work;
  • The social value of human labour and skills;
  • Decent work and job quality;
  • Power, politics, influence and voice at work;
  • The future of trade unions;
  • Comparative employment relations;
  • The history and future of IR;
  • Living wages and low pay;
  • Political economy of work (e.g. austerity, financialisation, fragmentation, flexibilisation and inequality);
  • New forms of collective action in the workplace, and new agents of resistance.

 Submission details

Link for abstract submission: https://forms.gle/GUcfKK1hJ3jXaJWn7

Abstracts should be a maximum of 500 words in length and cover the following headings:

  •         Brief outline
  •         Methodology
  •         Key findings
  •         References

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 17th January 2022

All abstracts are refereed anonymously by BUIRA Executive Committee members.

Conference fee £190 full and £70 PhD 

There will also be a pre-conference Doctoral Workshop on Monday June 27th. Details to follow.

16th November 2021

IRRU Seminar Inequality at Work and Employees’ Perceptions of Organisational Fairness

Speaker:
Nuffield College, Universi
Professor Duncan Gallie, Emeritus Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford
 
Title:
Inequality at Work and Employees’ Perceptions of Organisational Fairness
 
Date/time:
Wednesday 24 November 2021, 14:00 – 15:30 (GMT)
  
Abstract:
Promoting ‘Fairness at Work’, as a way of both enhancing employee well-being and raising productivity, has become increasingly central to political discourse. There has been little research, however, on perceptions of fairness among British employees –
the extent to
which they regard their organisations as fair and the work experiences that most strongly inform their judgements. The seminar draws on evidence from the British Skills and Employment Surveys to examine the extent to which perceptions of fairness and their determinants vary between employees of different occupational status and between male and female employees.
 
Registration:
Book now via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/irru-202122-speaker-series-with-professor-duncan-gallie-tickets-191653660257 

16th November 2021

BUIRA special webinar: The GMB/Uber deal: implications for industrial relations in the gig economy and beyond

Thursday November 11th 2021 (3pm to 4.30pm) 

This webinar by the British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) debates the GMB-Uber recognition agreement, and the wider implications for the gig economy and industrial relations generally.

Please register on this Eventbrite link

Tony Dobbins, Chair (BUIRA President)

Mick Rix and Martin Smith from the GMB will present: the Uber deal – how did it happen, what does it mean? (30 minutes)

This will be followed by a Panel discussion involving: Yaseen Aslam, the App Drivers & Couriers Union President, Alan Bogg, Ursula Huws, Melanie Simms, Alex Wood.

Each will present their views, including discussing the GMB- Uber deal, implications for industrial relations, the future of work.

This will be followed by time for audience questions.

Zoom link:

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/87128019036

Meeting ID: 871 2801 9036

9th November 2021

British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) Annual General Meeting (AGM)

Friday December 3rd 2021, 11-12 o’clock

Online (Zoom)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/89868704910

Meeting ID: 898 6870 4910

 Agenda:

  1. Matters arising from last AGM

- BUIRA Code of Practice

  1. BUIRA Annual Conference 2022, University of Birmingham
  2. BUIRA Steward/Officer reports
  3. BUIRA Study Groups
  4. Other agenda items

-Intersectionality

  1. University of Bristol BUIRA Stewardship (2022-2025). Link here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nszXsRQeB2XhcHgFMnB1Xaz9oRVvTr8X/view?usp=sharing
  2. AOB

Any other agenda items for 5 please send to BUIRA President: t.dobbins@bham.ac.uk

9th November 2021

BUIRA Annual Conference 2022: Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work

University of Birmingham, June 28th-30th 2022

Plenary Speakers

Tamara Lee (Rutgers University, US): Why race and intersectionality matter for IR.

Paul Edwards (University of Birmingham): How and Where Employment Relations Matter(s)

Details for the third plenary will be announced as soon as possible.

Conference theme: 

The theme of this year’s conference is Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work.

Keith Sisson (2009, 2020) outlines Why Employment Relations MattersEmployment relations matters is a ten chapter text publicly available under a Creative Commons Licence. It has a double intention reflected in its title: to ensure people are up to date with the matters that the study of employment relations deals with and to explain why they matter. It has two main audiences in mind. First, people who teach and study employment relations. Second, practitioners and policy-makers.

Unsurprisingly, BUIRA has long argued that Employment Relations Matter(s). In ‘What’s The Point of Industrial Relations?’ the message was clear: ‘The agenda of industrial relations research and teaching thus has fundamental moral and practical importance’ than many other fields of study in contemporary business schools (BUIRA 2009, 53).

Employment relations commentators have also recently shown Why Employment Relations Matters. For example, Hodder and Martínez Lucio’s (2021) paper ‘Pandemics, politics, and the resilience of employment relations research’ suggests that the Covid-19 pandemic has appeared to change the public narrative on work and employment, and highlighted the continued relevance and value of employment relations as a field of study. They conclude that the Covid crisis has highlighted the resilience of the field of employment relations, reminding us of its critical relevance to academic and public interest. They outline the challenges faced by academics and practitioners in the field of employment relations to build upon this new found attention to ensure that employment relations issues remain central in terms of research, teaching and public policy.

Why Employment Relations Matters for Democratizing (and Decommodifying) Work has been strongly illustrated in the context of the Coronavirus public health pandemic. The pandemic has highlighted just how vital human work of social (not financial) value is for keeping human life and society functioning. Human workers are not merely commodities or human ‘resources’.

IR/ER and politics of work scholars have been at the forefront and contributed extensively to research and public policy during the pandemic to showcase why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work. To provide just a few illustrative examples: The social value of human labour during Covid (Martinez Lucio and McBride, 2020Winton and Howcroft, 2020); analysis of the furlough/job retention scheme (Stuart et al., 2021); the real living wage and addressing cost of living increases (Dobbins and Prowse, 2021); the effect of Covid on workers’ health and safety in places like call centres (Taylor, 2020).

That said, a clear message that emerged from the 2021 BUIRA conference is that there is scope for our field to extend it’s contribution to vital social matters like intersectionality – the intersection of identities around issues like gender, sexuality, race and class (Lee and Tapia, 2021McBride et al., 2015Moore and Taylor, 2021). Intersectionality is a domain where employment relations does and should matter. There is also potential for work and employment scholars to contribute to thinking and public policy debates on green IR and climate crisis (Clarke and Lipsig-Mummé, 2020).

Evidently, the field of ER/IR has broadened considerably thematically since the early historical focus on collective bargaining and IR institutions and rules. However, it needs to continually adapt and update to address issues arising in the real world of the politics of work. 

Call for Papers

The conference team welcome papers on any sub-theme under the broad theme of Why Employment Relations Matter(s) for Democratizing Work. Illustrative examples of sub-themes include:

  • Implications of Coronavirus for the future of work (e.g. flexible working);
  • Green industrial relations, green jobs, climate crisis;
  • Intersectionality, equality, gender, race, class, disability, and IR;
  • New technology, the gig economy and the politics of work;
  • The social value of human labour and skills;
  • Decent work and job quality;
  • Power, politics, influence and voice at work;
  • The future of trade unions;
  • Comparative employment relations;
  • The history and future of IR;
  • Living wages and low pay;
  • Political economy of work (e.g. austerity, financialisation, fragmentation, flexibilisation and inequality);
  • New forms of collective action in the workplace, and new agents of resistance.

 

Submission details

Link for abstract submission: https://forms.gle/GUcfKK1hJ3jXaJWn7

Abstracts should be a maximum of 500 words in length and cover the following headings:

  •         Brief outline
  •         Methodology
  •         Key findings
  •         References

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 17th January 2022

All abstracts are refereed anonymously by BUIRA Executive Committee members.

Conference fee £190 full and £70 PhD 

There will also be a pre-conference Doctoral Workshop on Monday June 27th. Details to follow.

8th November 2021

Work in the Global Economy Journal

The inaugural issue of 'Work in the Global Economy Journal' is now online! Read it for free until 31 December: https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bup/wge
 
 
Work in the Global Economy: Editorial Introduction
pp. 3-12(10)
Authors: Moore, Sian; Newsome, Kirsty
 
The return of the labour process: race, skill and technology in South African labour studies
pp. 13-32(20)
Authors: Kenny, Bridget; Webster, Edward
 
Subcontracted racial capitalism: the interrelationship of race and production in meat processing plants
pp. 33-53(21)
Authors: Piro, Valeria; Sacchetto, Devi
 
Surveilling Amazon’s warehouse workers: racism, retaliation, and worker resistance amid the pandemic
pp. 55-73(19)
Authors: Alimahomed-Wilson, Jake; Reese, Ellen
 
Rights without remedy: the disconnection of labour across multiple scales and domains
pp. 75-93(19)
Authors: Tartanoglu Bennett, Safak; Hammer, Nikolaus; Jenkins, Jean
 
Organised by transitions: the self-organisation of next-generation welfare professionals in Slovenia
pp. 95-117(23)
Authors: Samaluk, Barbara; Greer, Ian Colling
 
Workplace regimes: a sociological defence and elaboration
pp. 119-138(20)
Author: Wood, Alex J.
 
Beyond technological determinism: revitalising labour process analyses of technology, capital and labour
pp. 139-159(21)
Authors: Thompson, Paul; Laaser, Knut
 
Between automation and gamification: forms of labour control on crowdwork platforms
pp. 161-184(24)
Authors: Krzywdzinski, Martin; Gerber, Christine
 
The petri dish and Russian roulette’: working in UK contact centres during the COVID-19 pandemic
pp. 185-208(24)
Author: Taylor, Phil
 
Mobilisation and me
pp. 209-222(14)
Author: Smith, Dave

2nd November 2021

Manchester Industrial Relations Society - 18 November 2021

On 18 November we will be holding a Manchester Industrial Relations Society meeting organised in conjunction with the Work and Equalities Institute , University of Manchester and the CIPD. The meeting is an opportunity to remember and reflect on the work and contribution of our colleague Professor Mick Marchington, who sadly died in February 2021. Mick was a former president of MIRS and made a huge contribution to the academic study of human resource management, and through his work with the CIPD made a lasting impact on the status of academic research and critical social science within the teaching and accreditation of HRM among practitioners. Our event will involve a panel featuring Prof Jill Rubery, Prof Damian Grimshaw, Prof Tony Dundon and Dr Gail Hebson, who worked on numerous major research projects with Mick on topics including the fragmentation of work and employee voice. This will be followed by a panel of speakers from the CIPD (Ali House, Heather Bond and Jonny Gifford) who worked closely with Mick in translating research into professional standards for practitioners and will also talk about the new CIPD research fund named in Mick’s honour.

 

The event will be held at 6pm-7.30pm on Thursday 18 November over Zoom, and you can register here via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/mirs-meeting-18-november-2021-remembering-mick-marchington-tickets-191556138567

2nd November 2021

Original Thinking Lecture with Anthony Rafferty

Skill-underutilisation and discrimination in the labour market: Why it matters and what can be done about it?

 

16:30 - 17:30, Wednesday 3 November 2021
in person and online

 

The people management case for workplace equality, diversity and inclusion is often made in terms of ethical or social responsibility reasons, or the benefits to the bottom line of a ‘business case.’

 

In this Original Thinking lecture, Anthony Rafferty, Professor of Employment Studies and Managing Director of the Work and Equalities Institute at Alliance MBS. will examine evidence for an argument traversing both perspectives: That workplace discrimination leads to an under-utilisation of skill and human potential that can be harmful to the individual, society but also business performance and productivity.

 

This event will be facilitated by Professor Jill Rubery, Executive Director of the Work and Equalities Institute

You can register to attend online or in person at Alliance Manchester Business School, where there will be a refreshments served after the lecture.

 

Book my place

2nd November 2021

First publication on ballots under the 2016 Trade Union Act

'Strike ballots under the 2016 Trade Union Act: unions mobilise to counter the latest legal onslaught', by Dave Lyddon, has now been published online by the Industrial Relations Journal.

This is the first systematic analysis of ballots under the Act and is clearly topical given the current ballots in the university sector.

2nd November 2021

Webinar – Sight Loss Needn’t Mean Job Loss 18th Nov 1pm - 2pm

With the right support, workplace adjustments and assistive technology, people living with sight loss can enjoy productive and rewarding careers.
 
We'll look at the challenges faced by over 2 million UK people and the available workplace and home based solutions; it is suitable for occupational therapists, case managers and those working in all aspects of vocational rehabilitation and wellbeing at work.
 
So, join us to increase your knowledge of visual impairment and empower yourself to better support your clients and/or colleagues who live with sight loss. 
 
Register in advance at 
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZwrf-yuqjktE9OlRjjpk3oeebBrUQWQP1Um
 
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

2nd November 2021

Launch of Reid Foundation paper, ‘Beyond ‘Just Transition’’, 7pm. Thursday 2 December 2021

After the COP26 circus has left town, we invite you to engage in thinking through how the union and environmental movements can work together by learning from each other in a way that requires going beyond ‘Just Transition’. This is to lay out the basis for an economy and society that is democratic, egalitarian and environmentally safe. 

Dr Eurig Scandrett will present his paper called 'Beyond 'Just Transition'' - see details below. He is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Queen Margaret University and a longstanding union activist and environmental campaigner. 

The paper will be discussed by Fiona Montgomery (UNISON Scotland officer), Sam Mason (PCS union political officer) and Dave Moxham (STUC deputy general secretary). 

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beyond-just-transition-tickets-203242412527 

Those registering for the event will be sent the zoom link for attending on the morning of Thurs 2 December. The event will be recorded for subsequent broadcasting. 

Summary of paper 

The idea of ‘Just Transition’ (JT) has gained traction in recent years. With its roots in the union movement, it has developed into a concept with diverse and contested meanings. This paper takes a longer-term view of JT in order to ask what do we mean by ‘Just’ and to what are we expecting to ‘Transition’ to? It argues the collective interests of workers, low-income communities and the environment are central, and require mechanisms to facilitate productive but challenging dialogue between these interests. But that dialogue can in seeking common ground between the two principal social movements, can also lead to a dilution of principles, leaving neither movement particularly satisfied. So, this paper shows how approaching JT in a specific way and from a particular perspective can provide the opportunity for a deeper dialogue in which the key stakeholders – the environment and working-class people through their unions - can fruitfully seek to incorporate the principles of each other, leading to a meaningful and lasting resolution of the tensions between them. These tensions are exemplified by unions trying to represent the immediate interests of their members and the long-term interests of the working class while the environmental movement is composed of disproportionately well-educated, white and middle-class professionals who have little connection with the communities most directly affected by environmental devastation. 

This paper is, therefore, not intended to reflect the policy of any union or environmental group, but rather be a contribution to a debate within and between these movements. It is, in places, designed to challenge. Indeed, it makes the case that the union and environmental movements can best learn from one another by being willing to be challenged by each other. 

So, JT can then be more than a mechanism to address climate change but rather a process which can be applied to transitions of many kinds that the labour movement and the Left more generally have long advocated: the transition to a more democratic economy, equal society and socially beneficial production. The paper, thus, argues the union movement, along with environmental and anti-poverty movements, would benefit from going ‘beyond’ just transition. 

2nd November 2021

Industrial Relations Unit (IRRU) Seminar Speaker Series – Autumn 2021 (Term 1)

Negotiating for Creativity: Working for Nothing in the Creative  Industries
Irena Grugulis and Dimitrinka Stoyanova Russell
 
Wednesday 10 November 2021, 14:00 to 15:30 GMT via Zoom
 
Why do highly skilled professionals work for nothing? In the UK film and TV sector it is commonplace for professionals to work without being paid. This is most common among novices, who may move from one under- or un-funded project to another; but established and prize-winning senior professionals will “obviously” work for nothing if they are interested in a project. This article draws on detailed qualitative research to interrogate these intrinsic rewards and extend the idea of ‘hope labour’. It uses the idea of individual bargaining power to argue that experiences varied according to professionals’ individual expertise and analyses the exploitation of
novices, intensification of work for more experienced workers and negotiation by established professionals.
 
Book now via Eventbrite:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/irru-202122-speaker-series-with-professor-irena-grugulis-tickets-191646508867

2nd November 2021

British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) Annual General Meeting (AGM)

Friday December 3rd 2021, 11-12 o’clock

Online (Zoom)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/89868704910

Meeting ID: 898 6870 4910

 Agenda:

1. Matters arising from last AGM

- BUIRA Code of Practice

2. BUIRA Annual Conference 2022, University of Birmingham

3. University of Bristol BUIRA Stewardship (2022-2025). Link here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1nszXsRQeB2XhcHgFMnB1Xaz9oRVvTr8X/view?usp=sharing 

4. BUIRA Steward/Officer reports

5. Other agenda items

-Intersectionality

6. AOB

Any other agenda items for 5 please send to BUIRA President: t.dobbins@bham.ac.uk

1st November 2021

Webinar: Steps to Decolonization

Wednesday 27 October 2021 1pm-2pm

 

The university Diversity Interest Group (DIG) are proud to host a webinar in celebration of Black History Month.

 

We are delighted to be joined by two great speakers with an additional panel disucssion:

 

Dr Jenny Rodriguez on,  "Doing the work: Lessons from a workshop about decolonial pedagogies of transformation in teaching and learning praxis in business and management” and

Dr Azumah Dennis on, "Decolonisation: ten curricula provocations"

 

Dr Rodroguez and Dr Dennis will then be joined by Dr Kenisha Linton of the Business School for a panel discussion 

 

The event will be hosted online via MS Teams. Everyone is welcome.

To join, click here

26th October 2021

2021 Jimmy Reid Foundation annual lecture

Video recording of Roz Foyer, STUC general secretary, giving the 2021 Jimmy Reid Foundation annual lecture on 7 October on a 'People's Recovery': 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9McMin8lAw&ab_channel=STUCCovid-19updates 

 

For more details see: https://reidfoundation.scot/ 

26th October 2021

Remembering Mick Marchington: Manchester Industrial Relations Society Meeting 18th November 2021

On 18 November 2021, we will be holding a Manchester Industrial Relations Society meeting organised in conjunction with the Work and Equalities Institute, University of Manchester and the CIPD. The meeting is an opportunity to remember and reflect on the work and contribution of our colleague Professor Mick Marchington, who sadly died in February 2021. Mick was a former president of MIRS and made a huge contribution to the academic study of human resource management, and through his work with the CIPD made a lasting impact on the status of academic research and critical social science within the teaching and accreditation of HRM among practitioners.

Our event will involve a panel featuring Prof Jill Rubery, Prof Damian Grimshaw, Prof Tony Dundon and Dr Gail Hebson, who worked on numerous major research projects with Mick on topics including the fragmentation of work and employee voice. This will be followed by a panel of speakers from the CIPD (Ali House, Heather Bond and Jonny Gifford) who worked closely with Mick in translating research into professional standards for practitioners and will also talk about the new CIPD research fund named in Mick’s honour.

The event will be held at 6pm-7.30pm on Thursday 18 November over Zoom, and you can register here via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/mirs-meeting-18-november-2021-remembering-mick-marchington-tickets-191556138567

19th October 2021

Healthy Ageing Innovation Fellow (Secondment opportunity available)

Part time: 50-70% FTE (subject to discussion and agreement with successful candidate) Fixed term for 18 months. 

Grade7 £34,304- £40,927 p.a. (Pro Rata) 

The closing date for applications is midnight on Sunday 14 November 2021.

https://www.stir.ac.uk/about/work-at-stirling/list/details/?jobId=2770&jobTitle=Healthy%20Ageing%20Innovation%20Fellow%20(Secondment%20opportunity%20available)

 

19th October 2021

BUIRA special webinar: The GMB/Uber deal: implications for industrial relations in the gig economy and beyond

Thursday November 11th 2021 (3pm to 4.30pm) 

This webinar by the British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) debates the GMB-Uber recognition agreement, and the wider implications for the gig economy and industrial relations generally.

Please register on this Eventbrite link

Tony Dobbins, Chair (BUIRA President)

Mick Rix and Martin Smith from the GMB will present: the Uber deal – how did it happen, what does it mean? (30 minutes)

This will be followed by a Panel discussion involving: Yaseen Aslam, the App Drivers & Couriers Union President, Alan Bogg, Ursula Huws, Melanie Simms, Alex Wood.

Each will present their views, including discussing the GMB- Uber deal, implications for industrial relations, the future of work.

This will be followed by time for audience questions.

Zoom link:

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/87128019036

Meeting ID: 871 2801 9036

19th October 2021

Nomination suggestions for AcSS Fellows

BUIRA members are welcome to offer nomination suggestions for Academy of Social Science Fellows:

Please email nominations by November 1st to: admin@buira.org or t.dobbins@bham.ac.uk

 

The next deadline for Fellow nominations is 3rd December 2021.

Here are the guidelines and criteria:  https://acss.org.uk/our-fellows/nominate-a-fellow/

In essence, nominees would need to be senior colleagues with extensive academic and broader contributions to IR/ER/the social sciences.

19th October 2021

Launch of Book The Living wage: Advancing a Global Movement 4th November 6-7pm

Tony Dobbins and Peter Prowse invite you to their book launch on Thursday 4th November 6-7pm live in Stoddart Building or live on Zoom. For details, please contact Peter Prowse: p.prowse@shu.ac.uk

12th October 2021

Professor Jane Holgate (University of Leeds) and Professor Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde)

BUIRA would like to express many congratulations to Professor Jane Holgate (University of Leeds) and Professor Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde) for being awarded Fellowships by the Academy of Social Sciences. This is for their many contributions to industrial relations, work and employment.

 

https://acss.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/Autumn-2021-Fellows-for-conferment-by-institution.pdf

6th October 2021

Fully Funded PhD Studentship - Flexible Working: the factors influencing outcomes

Applications are invited for a fully funded (fees + stipend) PhD Studentship at Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield University, UK.  The PhD topic will focus on examining factors which influence outcomes for employers and/or employees.  The research will be supervised by Professor Clare Kelliher and Dr Deirdre Anderson.   

Please find details about the studentship and the application process below. 

https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/som/research-degrees/phd-studentships/phd-studentship-in-flexible-working-the-factors-influencing-outcomes

Further information is available on the programme webpage.

https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/som/research-degrees/phd-programme

5th October 2021

ESRCs Transforming Working Lives

Our aim is to fund a series of innovative and novel research projects looking at two overarching themes: managing working transitions and power and voice in a changing world of work. Please see our website for further information about the call:

https://www.ukri.org/opportunity/investigate-changes-in-working-lives-and-power-in-the-workplace/ 

We are approaching experts in this field and would greatly appreciate your assistance with widening our pool of experts for this process to ensure we fund research of the highest quality that will make a significant contribution to addressing challenges with key polices, practices or both.

Information on the review process can be found below. Please circulate this across your networks and advise interested persons to contact jessica.tait@esrc.ukri.org and twl@esrc.ukri.org for more information and to express interest.

Activities and Workload


This role would include reviewing proposals submitted under the scheme. We are expecting a high volume of applications to this call so it is likely that each peer reviewer will receive approximately 5-6 proposals to assess. We will ask reviewers to provide comments relating to specific criteria and score each proposal between 1-10. Full peer review guidance will be provided to guide reviewers through the process.

Timings

We expect to send proposals to reviewers for peer review in mid/late October 2021 and they will have 4 weeks to review their allocation.

Conflicts of Interest

Please highlight in your reply if you intend to be involved in any proposals being submitted to this call, or if you have any recent collaborators who you know will be applying.

Please note that the closing date for applications has not yet passed (closes 30th September 2021). As such we do not have full details of the applications that will be submitted at this time.

5th October 2021

BUIRA special webinar

The GMB/Uber deal: implications for industrial relations in the gig economy and beyond

Thursday November 11th 2021 (3pm to 4.30pm) 

This webinar by the British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) debates the GMB-Uber recognition agreement, and the wider implications for the gig economy and industrial relations generally.

Please register on this Eventbrite link

Tony Dobbins, Chair (BUIRA President)

Mick Rix and Martin Smith from the GMB will present: the Uber deal – how did it happen, what does it mean? (30 minutes)

This will be followed by a Panel discussion involving: Yaseen Aslam, the App Drivers & Couriers Union President, Alan Bogg, Ursula Huws, Melanie Simms, Alex Wood.

Each will present their views, including discussing the GMB- Uber deal, implications for industrial relations, the future of work.

This will be followed by time for audience questions.

Zoom link:

https://bham-ac-uk.zoom.us/j/87128019036

Meeting ID: 871 2801 9036

5th October 2021

Manchester Industrial Relations Society meeting 14 October - Organising freelance workers in the creative industries in a global pandemic

We hope you are well in what remain difficult and uncertain times, and hopefully you had something of a break over the summer. Our programme of meetings for the 2021/22 academic year is taking shape, and we will be holding our first meeting on Thursday 14 October at 6pm. We have decided to keep most of our meetings online for the coming year and will not be charging for membership renewals in 2021/22. We will be holding the final meeting of the year in May 2022 as an in-person event with a social event afterwards, but our plan will be hold this as a hybrid event so those not able to be with us in person can attend the meeting remotely.

 

Our first meeting of the year, on 14 October, will involve Ian Manborde, Equality and Diversity Organiser for the Equity trade union, and John Shortell, Head of Equality, Diversity & Inclusion for the Musician’s Union, presenting a talk entitled ‘Organising freelance workers in the creative industries in a global pandemic’ A summary is below, followed by a link to an Eventbrite page where you can book a place at the talk and receive the relevant Zoom link.

 

This MIRS session provides an opportunity to gain insight to the challenges of organising self-employed workers across the entertainment industry. Representatives of both Equity and MU will provide an overview of the dominant, prevailing challenges of organising and mobilising across highly precarious, segmented groups of workers, and the innovative strategies deployed to maintain existing membership and recruit new members. Additionally, the session will provide insight on the combined negative impacts arising from the EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement and Covid pandemic on the sector, its workers, and organising strategies.

 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/organising-freelance-workers-in-the-creative-industries-tickets-170297469315

 

5th October 2021

Ella Baker School in conversation with Jane Holgate, discussing her book: 'Arise. Power, Strategy and Union Resurgence'

Start: Tuesday, October 12, 2021  7:00 PM  British Summer Time (GMT+01:00)

End: Tuesday, October 12, 2021  9:00 PM  British Summer Time (GMT+01:00)

We are delighted to announce that we will be in conversation  with Jane Holgate, discussing her book: 'Arise. Power, Strategy and Union Resurgence.

Drawing on history and case studies of unions developing and using power effectively, this book offers strategies for moving beyond the pessimism that prevails in much of today's union movement. By placing power analysis back at the heart of workers' struggle, Jane shows us that transformational change is not only possible, but within reach.

We will be joined by an amazing panel chaired by Michael McNeil (national official at UCU):

  • Heather Blakey, Unite Community Co-ordinator
  • David (DBH) Braniff-Herbert; equality organiser at NEU
  • Heather Connolly, Associate Professor of Industrial Relations
  • Sarah Woolley, General Secretary BFAWU
  • Wilf Sullivan, TUC Race Equality Officer

And, if you sign up we will give you a discount code which will save you 30% off the paperback edition of the book!

The session is live, participatory and will be a mix of panel discussions and break out rooms.

Takes place over ZOOM. - register here...

https://actionnetwork.org/events/ella-baker-school-in-conversation-with-jane-holgate-discussing-her-book-arise-power-strategy-and-union-resurgence

5th October 2021

Articles from the iLabour Project based at the Oxford Internet Institute

You may be interested in these two articles from the iLabour Project based at the Oxford Internet Institute which investigate protest in the gig economy. 
 
Antagonism beyond employment: how the ‘subordinated agency’ of labour platforms generates conflict in the remote gig economy – Socio-economic Review, by Alex Wood and Vili Lehdonvirta https://academic.oup.com/ser/advance-article/doi/10.1093/ser/mwab016/6375544
 
 
Abstract: This article investigates why gig economy workers who see themselves as self-employed freelancers also engage in collective action traditionally associated with regular employment. Using ethnographic evidence on the remote gig economy in North America, the UK and the Philippines, we argue that labour platforms increase the agency of workers to contract with clients and thus reduce the risk of false self-employment in terms of the worker–client relationship. However, in doing so, platforms create a new source of subordination to the platform itself. We term this phenomenon ‘subordinated agency’ and demonstrate that it entails a ‘structured antagonism’ with platforms that manifests in three areas: fees, competition and worker voice mechanisms. Subordinated agency creates worker desire for representation, greater voice and even unionization towards the platform, while preserving entrepreneurial attitudes towards clients.
 
 
Dynamics of contention in the gig economy: Rage against the platform, customer or state? – New Technology, Work and Employment by Alex Wood, Nick Martindale and Vili Lehdonvirta https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ntwe.12216
 
Abstract: Protest in the gig economy has taken many forms and targets (platforms, customers and state officials). However, researchers are yet to adequately account for this diversity. We use a European survey of Upwork and PeoplePerHour platform workers to investigate worker orientation towards different forms of protest. Results reveal that worker anger, dependence and digital communication shape contention in the remote gig economy. Support for collective organisation is associated with anger at platforms as well as their dependence on the platform and communication with other workers. Individual action against clients is associated with anger and communication but not dependence. Support for state regulation is associated only with anger but not dependence or communication. We conclude that the relational approach entailed by Mobilisation Theory can aid explanation in the gig economy by shedding light on the dynamic process by which solidarity and dependence alter the perceived cost/benefits of particular remedies to injustice.
 
A summary of the research can be found here: https://ilabour.oii.ox.ac.uk/why-do-platform-workers-protest/

5th October 2021

Workers’ Experiences of Working from Home during the Covid-19 Pandemic – Liberation or Incarceration?’

BUIRA Scotland, the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation (University of Strathclyde) and STUC 

Extended Seminar – Wednesday 6 October (14.00-16.00) 

Workers’ Experiences of Working from Home during the Covid-19 Pandemic – Liberation or Incarceration?’. 

Booking required: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-scotland-and-the-department-of-work-employment-organisation-unive-tickets-173605457597 

Homeworking and teleworking have been the focus of considerable academic, policy maker and practitioner attention for more than two decades, since the technological means existed to facilitate ‘remote’ working. Yet, by late-2019, only just over 5% of the UK workforce reported that they were mainly working from home (WFH), according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS, 2020). A general observation was that WFH had been largely the preserve of higher-grade professional, technical, managerial, creative and academic employees. From March 2020, though, the Covid-19 pandemic brough an abrupt change that resulted in unprecedented millions of clerical workers transitioned from the workplace, the majority with no prior WFH experience. According to one study the proportion of those WFH rose from 5.7 per cent of the workforce immediately before the Spring lockdown to 43.1% in April 2020 (Felstead, 2021). While the proportion WFH fell to around one-in-four workers by late August 2020, it rose by 16 percentage points into 2021 in conditions of the second lockdown (Felstead, 2021). 

If WFH appeared initially to be a temporary exigency, the duration of the Covid-19 pandemic meant that home working resulted in more than a brief hiatus from the workplace.  Currently, the advice in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland remains for workers who can to remain WFH, though in England a gradual return to the workplace has been encouraged. Nevertheless, the immediate and even longer term future appears to be that forms of hybrid working will become commonplace, even as more workers appear set to return for at least part of the time to the workplace. WFH has had momentous consequences for the way that work has been organised and for workers’ experiences. The dramatic change in loci and the associated technological means has raised inter alia questions of management control and communication autonomy, discretion, target fulfilment, quality of work and productivity. For workers, issues relating to the suitability of workstations in the home, to physical and mental health and well-being, to isolation and colleague collaboration, to work-life balance and gender have become prominent. There have been consequences too for the employment relationship and more specifically for trade unions and the exercise of employee voice. 

This extended seminar is being organised by British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) Scotland and by the Department of Work, Employment and Organisation at the University of Strathclyde as part of its seminar programme. Both Professor Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde) and Professor Abigail Marks (University of Newcastle) will be presenting findings and discussion the implications, both theoretically and in terms of policy, from their respective major research projects on the experiences of working from home which commenced in 2020 and are ongoing. In addition, Dave Moxham from the Scottish Trades Union Congress will contribute a perspective based on the experiences of trade unions and trade unionists in Scotland. The seminar will also feature contributions by PhD students in the Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, whose researches have been impacted by Covid-19 and who have had to re-orient their fieldwork to take account of these novel conditions. 

Speakers and Timetable: 

Chair’s Introduction: Dr. Stewart Johnstone (Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, University of Strathclyde) 

Presentation: Professor Abigail Marks – (Newcastle University Business School)

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/business-school/staff/profile/abigailmarks.html#background 

Trade Union Experiences: Dave Moxham, Deputy General Secretary, Scottish Trades Union Congress 

Introduction: Dr. Kendra Briken Doing a PhD During Covid-19

Student Research Experiences from Department of Work, Organisation and Employment, University of Strathclyde. 

Presentation and Summation: Professor Phil Taylor (Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, University of Strathclyde.

Booking required: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-scotland-and-the-department-of-work-employment-organisation-unive-tickets-173605457597

5th October 2021

New ETUI Book on role of industrial relations and long-term illness and returning to work

This book focuses on the role of industrial relations structures and related actors in terms of how far they remain relevant in addressing and facilitating the return to work of individuals following chronic illness.

While the demographic transition and the transformation of labour markets call for longer working lives and policies on active ageing, the prevalence of chronic health conditions has also increased in ageing societies. This exacerbates issues connected with shrinking workforces and the sustainability of social security systems. Concerns have also been raised about managing the return to work of workers with chronic illness or disabilities, challenging the inclusive workplace and other related social or labour market policies. The Covid-19 pandemic has additionally affected the return to work process in multiple ways, making the issue ever more important in the current public health context.

The chapters display a detailed picture of return to work processes alongside existing legal and policy frameworks and experiences from multiple governance stages (EU, national and company levels) and provide overview perspectives from distinct angles. Six countries – Belgium, Estonia, Ireland, Italy, Romania and Slovakia – are analysed in depth to understand how the return to work is implemented and perceived by national stakeholders, social partners, managers and workers.

The key message emerging from the analysis is that the return to work following chronic illness is a complex subject involving a multitude of actors and stakeholders each of whom might have a specific role to contribute to (the facilitation of) the overall process.

 

Book available from ETUI at - https://www.etui.org/publications/continuing-work

 

The Ireland Chapter is number 4 was researched and written by Eugene Hickland, Margaret Heffernan, Aurora Trif and Tish Gibbons from Dublin City University and finds: -

“The prevalence of chronic diseases has been growing in Ireland over the past few decades. The main work-related health problems are musculoskeletal disorders, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death, accounting for 36 per cent of all deaths (Turner et al. 2018) followed by cancer. There is also a growing incidence of mental health disorders, with depressive mental illnesses projected to be the leading cause of chronic illness in high income countries by 2030 (WHO 2008).

There is no national framework in Ireland which guides the reintegration of employees with chronic illness back into the workplace. Largely this is due to Ireland traditionally taking a voluntarist and decentralised approach to the regulation of employment terms and conditions. Instead there are a number of important, albeit relevant, ad hoc initiatives from government and other state bodies, trade unions, employer associations and campaigning and patient support organisations. Unlike in other countries, the passive welfare approach to social protection, mainly through income replacement or financial benefit, has been adopted in Ireland. Employees not covered by a collective agreement or as part of an employment contract have no statutory right to an occupational sick pay scheme. A major finding is that the majority of stakeholders accept that returning to work with, or after, chronic illness is an important issue. Early intervention, the timely and proactive use of organisational procedures, communication between key stakeholders and multidisciplinary coordination across government departments and agencies and at workplace level emerge as the most important factors in managing the return to work after chronic illness. Furthermore, there is no ‘one size fits all’ formula for such workers: ultimately, it is the needs of workers, as influenced by their illnesses, that are the most important consideration.”

 

5th October 2021

Historical Studies in Industrial Relations

It will be no surprise to anyone that the 2021 issue of Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, number 42, has been delayed by the Covid pandemic. It is now in the final stages of production. At £35 a volume (over 100,000 words), with electronic access to back-issues, HSIR remains good value. Payment can be made by direct debit; see https://www.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/journals/id/63 

 

Contents HSIR 42 (2021) 

Articles 

Michel S. Zouboulakis, ‘The Amendment of the Wage-Fund Theory and the Legalization of British Trade Unions in 1871’  

Joe England, ‘Formation, Legacy and Change in National Union of General and Municipal Workers, and the Transport and General Workers' Union, 1889–1978’ 

Paul Smith, ‘In Defence of Trade-Unionism: Bill Wedderburn and Rookes v. Barnard’ 

  1. H. (Bob) Fryer and Stephen Williams, ‘Representing Women: The Introduction, Context and Implications of Reserved Seats for Women in the National Union of Public Employees’  

 

Review essays 

 

Richard Croucher, ‘The Second World War: Remaking the British Working Class’ 

Geoffrey G. Field, Blood, Sweat, and Toil: Remaking the British Working Class, 1939–1945 (Oxford University Press: 2011).  

  

Dave Lyddon, ‘The Industrial Relations of In Place of Strife: The Search for Sanctions through the Prism of Key Industrial Disputes’ 

 

Peter Dorey, Comrades in Conflict: Labour, the Trade Unions and 1969’s In Place of Strife (Manchester University Press: 2019). 

  

Bob Carter: ‘The Working Class and Class and Electoral Strategy’ 

Clare Ainsley, The New Working Class: How to Win Hearts, Minds and Votes (Policy Press, Bristol: 2018) 

Book reviews 

Index for issues 31 to 41 

28th September 2021

Marchington Research Grant

Thr CIPD have launched a new research grant in memory of Mick Marchington.

For more information see: 
www.cipd.co.uk/marchington-research-grant

28th September 2021

Professor in Organisational Studies and HRM Group, Essex Business School

The Organisation Studies and Human Resource Management Group at Essex Business School has a global reputation for high-quality research, education, and scholarship, with international expertise in areas including critical organisation studies, the sociology of work, workplace equality and diversity, and HRM. It is home to the University’s Centre for Work, Organization and Society, along with a range of innovative undergraduate and postgraduate degrees including its CIPD accredited MSc HRM, its newly launched MSc Organisational Change Management, and its PhD in HRM and Organisation Studies.

 As part of a programme of academic expansion, we are now looking to appoint a talented and internationally established social scientist in the area of work and organisation studies. The successful candidate will play a leading role in further enhancing the research profile of both the Group and the School, as well as providing both an exceptional educational experience for our students and inclusive academic and administrative leadership to colleagues.

  • While we would encourage applications from individuals with expertise pertaining to any aspect of work and organisation studies, we would especially welcome applicants with a demonstrable research and teaching pedigree in any of the following areas: 
    •   Equality and inclusion
    •   Leadership and organisational change
    •   Technology and organisational innovation

 

See more: https://hrorganiser.essex.ac.uk/tlive_webrecruitment/wrd/run/ETREC107GF.open?VACANCY_ID=212024OYPY&WVID=9918109NEm&LANG=USA

21st September 2021

Diversity Interest Group (DIG) University of Greenwich Conference

Conference theme:  Contemporary Issues in Equality and Diversity

Wednesday 22 September 2021 10am

The conference theme, ‘Contemporary Issues in Equality and Diversity’ is designed to capture research being undertaken from any discipline that captures contemporary issues in Equality and Diversity from a range of perspectives.

Keynote: Professor Sian Moore "Systems or identities – how do we address equality in our work and in the University".

Papers will be presented covering the following themes: Stereotyping, Discrimination in the Workplace, Discrimination in Society and Education.

The conference is free to attend. Tickets are available via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/diversity-interest-group-autumn-conference-tickets-169727227707

 

21st September 2021

AIRAANZ 2022 Conference – ‘Call for abstracts’ deadline extended + online conference announcement

The Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ) 2022 Conference will be hosted by the Sydney Employment Relations Research Group (SERRG) and the Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies (WOS) at the University of Sydney Business School from Wednesday 9 to Friday 11 February 2022 (Australian Eastern Daylight Time).

Due to the ongoing uncertainty created by COVID and state and international border closures, the conference will be an online-only event.

The call for abstracts has also been extended to 29 October 2021.

The conference will involve a workshop for higher degree research students on Wednesday 9 February, with most other activities taking place on Thursday 10 and Friday 11 February.

The theme of the conference is: ‘Work Not As Usual'. This theme allows us to explore key issues for employment relations research including, but not limited to, the following:

  • The work-related impacts and implications of COVID-19
  • The challenges presented by low-paid and insecure forms of work and widening inequalities
  • Existing and emerging challenges relating to gender, work and family
  • The impacts of digitisation and technological change on work
  • The responses by employment relations actors and institutions (governments, employers, workers and their representatives) to rapid changes at work and in labour markets
  • The implications of changes in work for employment relations theory

 

We now invite submissions for the following:

  • Abstracts of papers to be presented in general conference sessions – due 29 October 2021
  • Abstracts of papers to be presented at the higher degree research student workshop – due 29 October 2021

 

Abstracts of papers to be presented in general conference sessions should be 250 words max and include the author/s name, affiliations and contact details, research question, methodological approach, theoretical focus and main conclusions.

Abstracts of papers to be presented at the higher degree research student workshop should be 250 words max and include the author name, affiliations and contact details, research question, methodological approach, theoretical focus and main conclusions. Higher degree research students whose abstracts are accepted will be asked to submit a short paper (2,000 words max) by 9 January 2022. This short paper will help discussants to prepare constructive feedback.

Please use the submission form: https://business.sydney.edu.au/events/2022/airaanz

Questions regarding the conference should be sent to: airaanz2022.conference@sydney.edu.au

Members of the conference organising committee: Marian Baird, Stephen Clibborn, Rae Cooper, Bradon Ellem, Frances Flanagan, Meraiah Foley, Dimitria Groutsis, Sunghoon Kim, Angela Knox, Susan McGrath-Champ, Alex Veen, Mark Westcott, Chris F Wright

21st September 2021

Ella Baker School of Organising in conversation with Jane Holgate, discussing her new book: 'Arise. Power, Strategy and Union Resurgence

Start: Tuesday, October 12, 2021  7:00 PM  British Summer Time (GMT+01:00)

End: Tuesday, October 12, 2021  9:00 PM  British Summer Time (GMT+01:00)

We are delighted to announce that we will be in conversation with Jane Holgate, scholar, union educator and activist discussing her book: 'Arise. Power, Strategy and Union Resurgence.

Drawing on history and case studies of unions developing and using power effectively, this book offers strategies for moving beyond the pessimism that prevails in much of today's union movement. By placing power analysis back at the heart of workers' struggle, Jane shows us that transformational change is not only possible, but within reach.

We will be joined by an amazing panel chaired by Michael McNeil (national official at UCU):

  • Heather Blakey, Unite Community Co-ordinator
  • David (DBH) Braniff-Herbert; equality organiser at NEU
  • Heather Connolly, Associate Professor of Industrial Relations
  • Sarah Woolley, General Secretary BFAWU
  • Wilf Sullivan, TUC Race Equality Officer

 

And, if you sign up we will give you a discount code which will save you 30% off the paperback edition of the book!

The session is live, participatory and will be a mix of panel discussions and break out rooms.

Takes place over ZOOM.

Thanks -the Ella Baker School.

21st September 2021

BUIRA Scotland, the Department of Work, Employment & Organisation (University of Strathclyde) and STUC

Extended Seminar – Wednesday 6 October (14.00-16.00) 

Workers’ Experiences of Working from Home during the Covid-19 Pandemic – Liberation or Incarceration?’

Booking required: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-scotland-and-the-department-of-work-employment-organisation-unive-tickets-173605457597

Homeworking and teleworking have been the focus of considerable academic, policy maker and practitioner attention for more than two decades, since the technological means existed to facilitate ‘remote’ working. Yet, by late-2019, only just over 5% of the UK workforce reported that they were mainly working from home (WFH), according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS, 2020). A general observation was that WFH had been largely the preserve of higher-grade professional, technical, managerial, creative and academic employees. From March 2020, though, the Covid-19 pandemic brough an abrupt change that resulted in unprecedented millions of clerical workers transitioned from the workplace, the majority with no prior WFH experience. According to one study the proportion of those WFH rose from 5.7 per cent of the workforce immediately before the Spring lockdown to 43.1% in April 2020 (Felstead, 2021). While the proportion WFH fell to around one-in-four workers by late August 2020, it rose by 16 percentage points into 2021 in conditions of the second lockdown (Felstead, 2021). 

If WFH appeared initially to be a temporary exigency, the duration of the Covid-19 pandemic meant that home working resulted in more than a brief hiatus from the workplace.  Currently, the advice in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland remains for workers who can to remain WFH, though in England a gradual return to the workplace has been encouraged. Nevertheless, the immediate and even longer term future appears to be that forms of hybrid working will become commonplace, even as more workers appear set to return for at least part of the time to the workplace. WFH has had momentous consequences for the way that work has been organised and for workers’ experiences. The dramatic change in loci and the associated technological means has raised inter alia questions of management control and communication autonomy, discretion, target fulfilment, quality of work and productivity. For workers, issues relating to the suitability of workstations in the home, to physical and mental health and well-being, to isolation and colleague collaboration, to work-life balance and gender have become prominent. There have been consequences too for the employment relationship and more specifically for trade unions and the exercise of employee voice. 

This extended seminar is being organised by British Universities Industrial Relations Association (BUIRA) Scotland and by the Department of Work, Employment and Organisation at the University of Strathclyde as part of its seminar programme. Both Professor Phil Taylor (University of Strathclyde) and Professor Abigail Marks (University of Newcastle) will be presenting findings and discussion the implications, both theoretically and in terms of policy, from their respective major research projects on the experiences of working from home which commenced in 2020 and are ongoing. In addition, Dave Moxham from the Scottish Trades Union Congress will contribute a perspective based on the experiences of trade unions and trade unionists in Scotland. The seminar will also feature contributions by PhD students in the Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, whose researches have been impacted by Covid-19 and who have had to re-orient their fieldwork to take account of these novel conditions. 

Speakers and Timetable: 

Chair’s Introduction: Dr. Stewart Johnstone (Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, University of Strathclyde) 

Presentation: Professor Abigail Marks – (Newcastle University Business School)

https://www.ncl.ac.uk/business-school/staff/profile/abigailmarks.html#background

 

Trade Union Experiences: Dave Moxham, Deputy General Secretary, Scottish Trades Union Congress

 

Introduction: Dr. Kendra Briken Doing a PhD During Covid-19

Student Research Experiences from Department of Work, Organisation and Employment, University of Strathclyde.

 

Presentation and Summation: Professor Phil Taylor (Department of Work, Employment and Organisation, University of Strathclyde.

 

21st September 2021

New book by Tony Dobbins and Peter Prowse: The Living Wage: Advancing a Global Movement

https://routledge.pub/LivingWage

 

Description

 

As wealth inequality skyrockets and trade union power declines, the living wage movement has become ever more urgent for public policymakers, academics, and—most importantly—those workers whose wages hover close to the breadline. Most governments’ minimum wages are falling short, meaning millions of workers struggle to cover their living costs. By including the voices of those workers earning at, or near, the living wage alongside the opinions of leading experts in this field, this book is a pioneering contribution for public policymakers, as well as students and academics of work and employment relations, public policy, organisational studies, social economics and politics. 

 20% Discount Available - enter the code FLY21 at checkout*

Reviews

‘The 20th anniversary of the Living Wage campaign in the UK is a moment to look back and reflect on what’s been achieved. This insightful new book does just that, as well as putting the movement in its international context.’

Laura GardinerDirector, Living Wage Foundation

‘This important new book contains new insights on living wage developments in the UK and around the world, and provides greater understanding of how the living wage is used as a policy to address low pay and inequality.’

Stuart WrightChair, Living Wage Foundation Advisory Council and Group Property & Facilities Director, Aviva PLC

 

‘A fascinating account of the evolution of approaches to the living wage from an international perspective. This work is truly informative as we continue to seek solutions to income inequality across the UK.’

Gill DixHead of Workplace Policy, Acas

 

‘Against a backdrop of increasing income inequality and declining trades union membership and the collective bargaining it makes possible, statutory national minimum wages – which establish a floor under wages, are set by the state, and are compulsory – and national living wages – which establish a basic but decent standard of living, are set by civil-society organisations, and are voluntary – have recently been introduced in several countries. This book provides important insights from a wide range of researchers and public policy experts into the history, operation, and impact of these wage initiatives not only in the UK but also globally. It is essential reading for academics, practitioners, policy makers, and others who want to improve the prospects of the low-paid.’

Professor Sir George BainFounding Chair of the UK Low Pay Commission

 

'Unions have always been at the forefront of the fight for a living wage. This insightful book charts the evolution of the living wage in the UK and around the globe. And it highlights the need for the living wage to sit alongside fundamental reform of our labour market – with stronger rights for working people and their unions'

Paul NowakDeputy General Secretary, TUC

21st September 2021

BUIRA Online Paper Development Session: (De)professionalisation and the role of 'law': evolving professional projects in HR and legal services.

BUIRA Online Paper Development Session September 30th 12:15-13:00

(De)professionalisation and the role of 'law': evolving professional projects in HR and legal services.

Eleanor Kirk (University of Glasgow, School of Law) and Esme Terry (University of Leeds, ESRC Digit Research Centre)

In this seminar we explore the place of ‘law’ and the ‘legal’ in processes of professionalisation and de-professionalisation. We consider law and the legal as forms of technical expertise and as well as normative, ideological and legitimating resources. We will explore questions regarding the need for, and avenues of diffusion of law into society, to shed light on the varying fortunes of different occupational groups of expert and non-expert practitioners, and the evolution of law as an institution regulating work and employment. In this short work-in-progress presentation, we will outline the findings from two separate qualitative studies - drawing on data resulting from interviews with HR practitioners and lawyers respectively - and offer some preliminary synthesis of the findings from these distinct case studies.

Please register through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/paper-development-session-tickets-170356212016

If you have any questions or would like to present in a future paper development session please contact Emma: E.S.Hughes@liverpool.ac.uk

13th September 2021

Special Issue New Technology, Work and Employment

  1. The Internet, Social Media and Trade Union Revitalization:
  2. Still Behind the Digital Curve or Catching Up?
  3. Edited by Torsten Geelan and Andy Hodder 
  4. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/1468005x/2021/36/2
  5.  

 

7th September 2021

Dr Andrew Smith

  1. Dr Andrew Smith has recently left the University of Bradford and is now Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations and HRM at the University of Sheffield.
  2. His new email address is - andrew.john.smith@sheffield.ac.uk 

7th September 2021

New book by Mike Richardson: Tremors of Discontent: My Life in Print 1970-1988

New Book: Tremors of Discontent: My Life in Print 1970-1988

By Mike Richardson

https://www.brh.org.uk/site/pamphleteer/tremors-of-discontent/

Mike Richardson is a visiting research fellow at the University of the West of England

 

Book Description

While there are many academic studies of workers’ resistance and consciousness during the 1970s and 1980s, few accounts relate the personal-political experiences of the activists involved. Tremors of Discontent, however, explores how Mike Richardson’s individual consciousness came to change during that period. It shows how gradually his participation in trade union and left politics broke through his boyhood reserve, intensified by the external political, economic and social circumstances. By following the growth and development of his convictions and beliefs, Mike’s autobiographical account contributes to a greater understanding of how militant social and political views came to be held by thousands of rank-and-file trade unionists in Britain in the 1970s and 80s.

Reviews

An extraordinarily powerful and candid testimony that captures the elusive dynamic between lived experience, trade union activism and political consciousness.

Professor Sian Moore (FHEA), Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences Director, Public Services International Research Unit (PSIRU) and Co-Director, Centre for Research on Employment and Work (CREW) Co-Editor Work in the Global Economy Greenwich Business School

Personally, intensely honest; politically, thoughtfully radical. This timely memoir is of historic importance. It is also an excellent read.

Hilary Wainwright, Editor Red Pepper and author of A New Politics from the Left (Polity, 2018)

31st August 2021

New Book by Jane Holgate: Arise

In Arise, Jane Holgate argues that unions must revisit their understanding of power in order to regain influence and confront capital. Drawing on two decades of research and organising experience, Holgate examines the structural inertia of today’s unions from a range of perspectives: from strategic choice, leadership and union democracy to politics, tactics and the agency afforded to rank-and-file members.
 
In the midst of a neoliberal era of economic crisis and political upheaval, the labour movement stands at a crossroads. Union membership is on the rise, but the ‘turn to organising’ has largely failed to translate into meaningful gains for workers. There is considerable discussion about the lack of collectivism among workers due to
casualisation, gig work and precarity, yet these conditions were standard in the UK when workers built the foundations of the 19th-century trade union movement.
 
Drawing on history and case studies of unions developing and using power effectively, this book offers strategies for moving beyond the pessimism that prevails in much of today’s union movement. By placing power analysis back at the heart of workers' struggle, Holgate shows us that transformational change is not only possible, but within reach. 
 
_______
 
Endorsements
 
'Jane Holgate is a brilliant thinker. By centring her thesis on power, this book contributes to our understanding of what strategies and mechanisms enable workers to stand a chance at achieving justice' 
 
- Jane McAlevey is an organiser, scholar and author of 'No Shortcuts: Organizing for Power in the New Gilded Age' (Oxford University Press, 2018)
 
'A must-read - by a top-class scholar, union educator and activist, and  written with exceptional clarity. Readers will come away with a deeper understanding of the world and with the tools to change it' 
 
- John Kelly, Emeritus Professor of Industrial Relations at Birkbeck College University of London
 
'Part history text, part employment relations research; Jane Holgate's book critiques decades of union renewal strategies in the UK and questions assumptions from both the left and right over how to regain collective power rather than just recruit new members'
 
- Dave Smith is a blacklisted construction worker and co-author of 'Blacklisted: The Secret War Between Big Business and Union Activists' (New Internationalist, 2016)
 
'A brilliant treatise on how to think about worker power in the context of sweeping structural change. It is well past time for labour scholars to return to this fundamental question and Jane Holgate has made an indispensable contribution to the canon'
 
- Janice Fine, Professor of Labour Studies and Employment Relations, Rutgers University and Director of Research and Strategy at the Centre
on Innovation in Worker Organisation
 
'An excellent review of the leaps forward and setbacks for workers and their unions, and an invaluable read for Jane Holgate's astute analyses. But that's not what the book is about. It is about power. Power for workers, which is the reason for organising, and which is too often forgotten in the daily struggle. We can continue on the current path to oblivion, with unions becoming little more than legacy politicians, or remember our roots and aggressively organise in new ways with workers in
an evolving economy'
 
- Wade Rathke, founder and Chief Organiser of ACORN International 
 
'In examining the problems that we have to face to rebuild the movement, this analysis of power, who has it and how to build it, is a must-read for aspiring activists. An essential book for those who are committed to the idea that trade unionism is a vehicle through which we can organise to delivering transformative change for all workers'
 
- Wilf Sullivan, Race Equality Officer for the Trades Union Congress (TUC)
 
'Jane Holgate's experience as an academic and a union activist has given her unique insights that make this book an important read for anyone who wants to understand where unions have been, where they are now and where they need to go'
 
- Arnie Graf, community organiser with the Industrial Areas Foundation and author of 'Lessons Learned. Stories from a Lifetime of Organizing' (ACTA Publications, 2020)

31st August 2021

Ella Baker School in conversation with Alicia Garza, Co founder of Black Lives Matter

There will be a free, on-line event, on 9th September, featuring Alicia Garza, co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Prior to founding #BLM, Alicia had two decades of experience organising in low-income neighbourhoods including in Oakland. Her book: ‘The Purpose of Power’ is a fantastic introduction to the theory and practice of community organising, and is a must for UK changemakers.

As one reviewer said, the pages are filled:  ‘with equal measures of wisdom, comfort and irrefutable facts that intertwine to create a book that belongs in the hands of anyone that feels like a tiny cog in the colossal machine that is racial injustice and white supremacy’

Alicia herself has described the book as a 'love letter to black people'.

 

Sign up here: https://actionnetwork.org/events/ella-baker-school-in-conversation-with-alicia-garza-co-founder-of-black-lives-matter?source=direct_link&

 

Even if you don’t agree with her, Alicia will raise questions and challenges that will make us all think deeper about how we effect the change we desperately need.

The session will start with an interview of Alicia, by Ian Manborde, equality officer at the actor and performers union Equity.

We will then widen out the discussion to include reflections from an impressive panel:

  • Halima Begum, CEO of the Runnymede Trust
  • Mikaela Loach, climate change activist and co-creator of the Yikes Podcast
  • Sem Moema, Greater London Assembly Member and
  • Steve Edwards, a race equality activist and trade union shop steward.

We will then move into breakout groups for discussion before returning for a Q&A with the panel.

There are already 300 people registered, but our target is an audience of 1,000  which would both do justice to the commitment of Alicia, but also create a very valuable opportunity to discuss where we are in the battle to eradicate race discrimination here in the UK.

31st August 2021

Call for Participants: Gender Issues in Business Schools Network Workshop 2021, 11-12 October 2021 - online

We are calling for participants for the annual Gender Issues in Business Schools (GIBS) Network Workshop. This is an opportunity for doctoral and early career researchers or anyone new to gender research to engage in advanced dialogue and debate on gender issues in management, broadly defined. 

The workshop is inter-disciplinary and is open to all academic disciplines that can contribute to gender knowledge in the context of management, business, organisation, work and employment.  

During the two-day event, participants will: 

  • Present their work in a safe and supportive environment 
  • Hear from Editors about publishing gender research  in top business and management journals. 
  • Engage with a unique network of scholars who are engaged with gender issues in Business and Management Schools 
  • Receive constructive peer feedback on working in progress 

    Keynote Speakers [to be confirmed] 

    Who should participate? 
  • PhD students searching gendered topics, at any stage of study, in Business and Management schools, or allied social science disciplines, in the UK and overseas. 
  • Academics in the early stages of their careers, who are or would like to become research-active.  
  • Academics  who have recently developed an interest in researching gender and diversity issues. 

    Submitting your abstract: 

    Please submit a 500 words word abstract of your presentation. There are no restrictions on the topic areas. We welcome qualitative and quantitative research-based abstracts as well as critical research reviews and analyses covering a broad range of topics around gender and management. They can range from initial research design and initial findings to more developed work and/or theoretical contributions.  

All abstracts will be reviewed by members of the GIBS organising committee. Please submit your abstract via https://www.conftool.net/gender-issues2021 by 20th of September 2021. 

For inquiries related to the event, please contact the GIBS organising committee gibsnetwork@gmail.com.  

Attendance is FREE: the event is organised by the GIBS committee with funding from SAMS (Society for the Advancement of Management Studies). 

24th August 2021

In Memory of Professor David Marsden, LSE

The passing of Professor David Marsden is a big loss to the industrial relations community and more widely. Professor Marsden joined LSE as a Lecturer in 1980. He was a highly respected scholar with extensive knowledge of labour markets and comparative industrial relations. David died unexpectedly on Tuesday 10 August 2021. Deepest condolences to his family and friends from BUIRA.

 

Colleagues at LSE and beyond have been paying tribute and expressing condolences in memory of David:

https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/condolences/2021/08/18/in-memory-of-david-marsden/

24th August 2021

Launch of critique of Scottish Government’s ‘Fair Work’ policy, 17 August 7pm

The Foundation launches the critique by Professor Gregor Gall on Tuesday 17 August at 7pm. The discussant is Roz Foyer, STUC general secretary. 

Register for the launch at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/critique-of-scottish-governments-fair-work-policy-tickets-162134208783 

The paper can be accessed at https://reidfoundation.scot/2021/06/critique-of-scottish-governments-fair-work-policy-published/ 

3rd August 2021

AIRAANZ 2022 Conference – Call for papers and session proposal

The Association of Industrial Relations Academics of Australia and New Zealand (AIRAANZ) is pleased to announce that the AIRAANZ 2022 Conference will be hosted by the Sydney Employment Relations Research Group (SERRG) and the Discipline of Work and Organisational Studies (WOS) at the University of Sydney Business School from Wednesday 9 to Friday 11 February 2022.

The format of the conference is still yet to be determined due to the ongoing uncertainties associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and travel restrictions. We are hoping that at least some sessions will be held in-person at the University of Sydney Business School, with online participation available for all sessions.

The conference will involve a workshop for higher degree research students on Wednesday 9 February, with most other activities taking place on Thursday 10 and Friday 11 February.

The theme of the conference is: ‘Work Not As Usual'. This theme allows us to explore key issues for employment relations research including, but not limited to, the following:

  • The work-related impacts and implications of COVID-19
  • The challenges presented by low-paid and insecure forms of work and widening inequalities
  • Existing and emerging challenges relating to gender, work and family
  • The impacts of digitisation and technological change on work
  • The responses by employment relations actors and institutions (governments, employers, workers and their representatives) to rapid changes at work and in labour markets
  • The implications of changes in work for employment relations theory

We now invite submissions for the following:

  • Conference session proposals – due 15 August 2021
  • Abstracts of papers to be presented in general conference sessions – due 15 September 2021
  • Abstracts of papers to be presented at the higher degree research student workshop – due 15 September 2021

Conference session proposals should include the following details:

  • Session title
  • Names of session convenor/s, their affiliated institutions and email addresses
  • Names of arranged or proposed speakers and their paper titles/topics
  • Abstract explaining session theme (250 words max)

Abstracts of papers to be presented in general conference sessions should be 250 words max and include the author/s name, affiliations and contact details, research question, methodological approach, theoretical focus and main conclusions.

Abstracts of papers to be presented at the higher degree research student workshop should be 250 words max and include the author name, affiliations and contact details, research question, methodological approach, theoretical focus and main conclusions. Higher degree research students whose abstracts are accepted will be asked to submit a short paper (2,000 words max) by 9 January 2022. This short paper will help discussants to prepare constructive feedback.

Please use the submission form: https://business.sydney.edu.au/events/2022/airaanz

Questions regarding the conference should be sent to: chris.f.wright@sydney.edu.au

Members of the conference organising committee: Marian Baird, Stephen Clibborn, Rae Cooper, Bradon Ellem, Frances Flanagan, Meraiah Foley, Dimitria Groutsis, Sunghoon Kim, Angela Knox, Susan McGrath-Champ, Alex Veen, Mark Westcott, Chris F Wright

21st July 2021

Employment, Trade Unionism, and Class

Employment, Trade Unionism, and Class: The Labour Market in Southern Europe since the Crisis

By 

Gregoris Ioannou

https://www.routledge.com/Employment-Trade-Unionism-and-Class-The-Labour-Market-in-Southern-Europe/Ioannou/p/book/9780367142889

Book Description

The economic crisis has brought about a watershed in institutional, political, and social relations, reshaping the labour market and the class structure in southern Europe. This book provides a critical comparative assessment of the dynamics of change in the employment field, focusing on Spain, Greece, and Cyprus.

The book assesses how the liberalization and deregulation processes and the promotion of market-enhancing reforms progressed in three different national settings, identifying the forces, agents, contexts, and mechanisms shaping the employment and industrial relations systems. The comparative perspective used deciphers the interplay of external and internal dynamics in the restructuring of the labour field in Southern Europe, examining austerity and its contestation in connection with prevailing societal ideologies and class shifts. The first part of the book sets the theoretical and historical context, the second is comprised of three empirical national case studies, and the third discusses comparatively the handling of the crisis, its impact, and its legacy from the standpoint of a decade later. The book presents differences in industrial relations systems, trade union forms, and class composition dynamics, accounting for the development of the crisis and the reshaping of the employment field after one decade of crisis.

It will be of value to researchers, academics, professionals, and students working on issues of employment and industrial relations, labour market and labour law, political economy and class structure, as well as those interested in the contemporary society and economy of southern Europe in general, and Spain, Greece, and Cyprus in particular.

 

Table of Contents

Part I Southern Europe: the labour market and the crisis 1. The themes, the concepts and the field 2. Employment relations and crisis Part II The changing context of employment relations in Spain, Greece and Cyprus 3. Spain. Compression and upheaval 4. Greece. Suppression, contestation and levelling 5. Cyprus. Shock and resilience Part III Beneath and beyond the economic crisis: development, contention, and class struggle 6. Comparing and contrasting experiences and impact 7. Covid-19 and the new on-going crisis 8. The world of labour in Southern Europe from crisis to crisis

Gregoris Ioannou is a political sociologist and research fellow at the Law School of the University of Glasgow, UK.

Reviews

"Spain, Greece and Cyprus were the three EU countries with the worst employment crisis in recent years. Gregoris Ioannou’s book is the first to examine them together and in detail, with a clear analytical approach that digs into the causes and consequences of the crisis, challenging the mainstream institutional explanations and proposing alternative prospects for Southern Europe’s labour markets." Prof. Guglielmo MeardiSociology of Economic Labour Processes, Scuola Normale Superiore Florence, Editor of the European Industrial Relations Journal

  

"This book offers an indispensable review of recent changes in the fields of employment, trade union activity, political representation, social security, gender, and composition of the working class in Southern Europe. The study covers the impact of neoliberalism, the Global Financial Crisis, and COVID-19. Drawing upon the best literatures in the social sciences, law, and economic policy, the book examines how economic practices and social relations were (re-)regulated under neoliberalism and its crises. A valuable resource for our understanding of the dynamics of labour in contemporary Europe." Prof. Alfredo Saad Filho, Political Economy & International Development, King’s College London.

 

"Employment, Trade Unionism and Class: The Labour Market in Southern Europe since the Crisis is a crucial contribution to the literature on how the implementation of economic reforms contribute to labour flexibility and economic precariousness. Gregoris Ioannou has strong command of the political economy of Southern Europe in exploring the transformation of trade unionism and its impact on class composition in Spain, Greece, and Cyprus in the aftermath of the Great Financial Crisis. This book is a crucial contribution to the labour and political economy in Europe." Prof. Immanuel NessPolitical Science, City University of New York.

"Gregoris Ioannou provides a detailed and insightful assessment of the changes in industrial relations systems in Southern Europe since the emergence of the 2007-2008 economic crisis. In charting effectively, the economic, social, and political dynamics in which industrial relations systems and labour regulation are embedded in, the analysis offers valuable lessons about the impact of these developments in the European periphery and beyond." Aristea Koukiadaki, Senior Lecturer in Labour Law, University of Manchester

"This book is an important contribution to our understanding of how crises affect work and employment. Focusing on the long-lasting effects of the Great Financial Crisis and subsequent recession, the book looks in detail at the consequences for labour markets in Spain, Greece and Cyprus highlighting the role of agency in the process of institutional and labour market restructuring. By emphasising the choices open to actors, and by stressing that there are always choices even when alternative paths are sometimes less evident, the analysis presents a compelling explanation of how and why particular paths are chosen in moments of response to crisis. Reminding policy makers about the choices open to them and showing the problematic outcomes of paths previously travelled is a crucially important intellectual and practical agenda that this book centres." Prof. Melanie Simms, Work and Employment, University of Glasgow

 

21st July 2021

Conference theme: Contemporary Issues in Equality and Diversity

The Diversity Interest Group at the University of Greenwich would like to invite the submission of abstracts for the autumn conference to be held on Wednesday 22ndSeptember 2021. 

The conference theme, ‘Contemporary Issues in Equality and Diversity” is designed to capture research being undertaken from any discipline that captures contemporary issues in Equality and Diversity from a range of perspectives. Papers can be empirical, conceptual or action-based research. 

Presenters can choose from a traditional paper presentation with questions that should last 15 minutes followed by 5 minutes of questions or a lightning presentation that should last 10 minutes followed by ten minutes of questions. PhD students are invited to create posters of their research to be accompanied by a five-minute presentation to be delivered in small breakout rooms. 

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words long and should be emailed to DIG Deputy Dr Louise Hewitt 

(Louise.hewitt@greenwich.ac.uk). Deadline extended to 30th July 2021 

The conference will run in Teams and the programme and full details will be circulated nearer the time. 

 

13th July 2021

15th International Research Workshop - Methods for PhD

5–10 September 2021

Akademie Sankelmark, Flensburg (Germany)
http://www.phd-network.eu/irws/programme/

PROGRAMME

PARALLEL MORNING SESSION 1 (6 - 8 September 2021)

  • Data Analysis with Stata
    Tobias Gramlich, Hesse State Statistical Office
  • Qualitative Research Methods
    Dr. Fabian Hattke, University of Hamburg
  • Grounded Theory
    Dr. Gilberto Rescher, University of Hamburg
  • Writing your Literature Review
    Dr. Sylvia Rohlfer, CUNEF University

 

PARALLEL AFTERNOON SESSION 2 (6 - 8 September 2021)

  • Data Analysis with R
    Dr. Marco Lehmann, UKE Hamburg
  • Case Study Research
    Dr. Kamil Marcinkiewicz, University of Oldenbourg
  • Questionnaire Design
    Dr. Daniel Schnitzlein, Leibniz University Hannover
  • Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA)
    Dr. Jonas Buche, Leibniz University Hannover

 

PARALLEL SESSION 3 (9 September 2021)

  • Data Visualization
    Dr. Daniel Schnitzlein Leibniz University Hannover
  • Multi-level Modelling with R
    Dr. Daniel Lüdecke, UKE Hamburg
  • Academic English Writing
    Dr. Jonathan Mole, Europa-Universität Flensburg
  • Analysing Panel Data with Stata
    Dr. Timo Friedel Mitze, University of Southern Denmark

 

WORKSHOP COMMITTEE:

  • Dr. Wenzel Matiaske, Helmut-Schmidt-University
  • Dr. Simon Fietze, University of Southern Denmark
  • Dr. Heiko Stüber, Institute for Employment Research

 

FEES & CREDIT POINTS

499 Euro (with accommodation and meals)

It is possible to get a certificate on 5 credit points (according to the European Credit Transfer System).

 

WORKSHOP VENUE

The workshop will take place at the Akademie SankelmarkAkademieweg 6 in Oeversee (near Flensburg), Germany. The health, safety, and well-being of our lecturers, the staff at the Akademie and the participants are our top priorities. All necessary measures are taken to ensure everyone stays healthy. Further, we will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation and switch to an online workshop when necessary. 

CONTACT & REGISTRATION

For any questions don't hesitate to contact the workshop committee (irwsnetwork@gmail.com).

Please register for the workshop here or on the workshop website.

ORGANIZERS

  • Helmut-Schmidt-University/University of the FAF Hamburg, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences
  • Institute for Employment Research (IAB), The Research Institute of the Federal Employment Agency in Nuremberg
  • Akademie Sankelmark im Deutschen Grenzverein e.V.

 

SUPPORTERS

  • Europa-Universität Flensburg
  • University of Hamburg, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences
  • University of Hamburg, School of Business
  • Leuphana University Lüneburg, Faculty of Economics

13th July 2021

Request for Survey Participants – Early Career Academics

Dear Colleagues
 
I am a PhD researcher in the University of Limerick, Ireland, and am looking for participants for my survey questionnaire, which examines the experiences of early career academics (ECA), who may be exposed to precarious work arrangements. The title of my research study is ‘The challenges and tensions of precarious work in academia, and how workers and unions respond to work precarity’
.
This research has received research ethics approval from the Kemmy Business School Research Ethics Committee (KBSREC), University of Limerick. The survey should take approximately ten minutes to complete, depending on any additional comments participants may wish to make at the end of the survey.
 
The survey is for those who are employed in Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in Ireland or the UK and identify as early career academics (ECA). For the purpose of this research, an ECA is defined as someone who has completed a PhD within the last seven years, or is registered for a PhD, while employed in a HEI in a lecturing
and/or research role. The term ECA is used in the survey and includes early career researchers.
 
I attach link to survey: Precarious Academic Labour
 
If you have any concerns or questions, please let me know.
 
Thank you in advance.
 
Kind regards
 
Paula
 
Paula Tumulty
PhD Researcher
Dept. of Work and Employment Studies
Kemmy Business School,
University of Limerick

 

13th July 2021

Post-Doctoral Research Associate in the Future of Work (Newcastle University, UK)

Newcastle University Business School invites applications for a three-year Research Associateship in
the Future of Work.
This post offers an opportunity to be part of a new major research programme in the Future of Work
led by Professor Stephen Procter, the Alcan Chair of Management.
Full details can be found at:
https://jobs.ncl.ac.uk/job/Newcastle-Research-Associate-%28Future-of-Work%29/686777401/
.
Informal enquiries are welcome and can be directed to Professor Procter at:
stephen.procter@newcastle.ac.uk
.
The closing date for applications is July 22 2021.

 

6th July 2021

BUIRA Conference 2021: The past, present and future of industrial relations and the politics of work

July 13th to 15th 2021

Registration is now open for the BUIRA 2021 Annual Conference. Registration is free for BUIRA members and can be done through Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-conference-2021-tickets-158582643957 

 If you are not already a member, please join BUIRA here: http://buira.org/membership 

We have created a new conference website to host the programme. Zoom links will be added for each of the sessions nearer the time. To see the preliminary programme, please visit: https://sites.google.com/view/buira2021/ If you want to request changes to the programme, please do so by 5pm on Friday 9th July. We will endeavour to accommodate changes where possible. 

6th July 2021

CIPD Applied Research Conference – call for papers closes 16 July 2021

The call for papers is now open and closes on 16 July 2021

The Applied Research Conference (ARC) is an annual meeting place for academic researchers and practitioners working in people management, employment policy and related fields. It holds a unique place in bringing together these two communities to hear about cutting edge research in HR and discuss how it can be applied in practice.  

ARC is an interdisciplinary conference that covers a wide range of aspects of people management, employment, learning and development and organisational development. In all research papers presented, we set out to discuss the practical application of insights to organisational life and labour markets.

The CIPD Applied Research Conference (ARC) will be at the Alliance Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, on 26 – 27 January 2022. For the first time ever we hope to run a hybrid event, allowing the flexibility to attend in person or virtually.  More information is available here.

29th June 2021

Acas ‘fire and rehire’ report

Acas’ findings from its fact-finding exercise on ‘fire and rehire’ practices have now been made available on it’s website at https://www.acas.org.uk/fire-and-rehire-report.

29th June 2021

BUIRA 2021 Annual Conference

Dear all, 

Registration is now open for the BUIRA 2021 Annual Conference. Registration is free for BUIRA members and can be done through Eventbrite.   

If you are not already a member, please join BUIRA here.   

We have created a new conference website to host the programme. Zoom links will be added for each of the sessions nearer the time. To see the preliminary programme, please visit: https://sites.google.com/view/buira2021/ If you want to request changes to the programme, please do so by 5pm on Friday 9th July. We will endeavour to accommodate changes where possible. 

We look forward to seeing you at the conference! 

With best wishes, 

The BUIRA Executive Committee

22nd June 2021

The University of Bristol PhD Scholarship in Decent Work

The University of Bristol invites applications for a fully-funded PhD scholarship on Decent Work and Rooted Cosmopolitans supervised by Professor Peter Turnbull and Dr Huw Thomas. 

Please forward this to your current students and colleagues. 

The scholarship commences in October 2021.

 This studentship offers an opportunity to be part of a new major project on how rooted cosmopolitans orchestrate collective action within different epistemic communities in order to promote decent work in a global economy marred by not only the COVID pandemic but a crumbling architecture of global governance and rising nationalism.

Full details can be found here: https://www.bristol.ac.uk/management/study/postgraduate-research/postgraduate-research/

Informal enquiries: huw.thomas@bristol.ac.uk

 

22nd June 2021

Research Fellow, ESRC Sponsored Project: The Future of Part-time working: the impact of flexible furlough

Applications are invited for a one-year Research Fellow post at Cranfield School of Management to work on an ESRC sponsored project, examining the impact of using the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (flexible furlough) on employer perceptions of part-time working and the implications for economic recovery and future working.

Full details of the post are available at:

https://jobs.cranfield.ac.uk/vacancy/research-fellow-448126.html

Informal enquiries are welcome and should be directed to Project Director, Professor Clare Kelliher

clare.kelliher@cranfield.ac.uk

The closing date for applications is 4th July 2021

22nd June 2021

Alcan PhD Studentship in the Future of Work (Newcastle University, UK)

Newcastle University Business School invites applications for a three-year PhD studentship in the Future of Work.  The studentship commences in September 2021. 

This studentship offers an opportunity to be part of a new major research programme in the Future of Work led by Professor Stephen Procter, the Alcan Chair of Management. 

Full details of the studentship are available at:  https://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding/sources/allstudents/alcan21.html

Informal enquiries are welcome, and can be directed to Professor Procter at: stephen.procter@newcastle.ac.uk

The closing date for applications is July 7 2021

15th June 2021

Centre for Law at Work Workshop: Labour, strategy, and the constitutional protection of work

22 June 2021, 9.00 AM - 5.00 PM

The Lady Hale Moot Court, 8-10 Berkeley Square

The Centre for Law at Work are hosting a workshop on Tuesday 22nd June 2021 entitled 'Labour, strategy, and the constitutional protection of work: On the potential effectiveness of legal mobilisation'.

The central concern of this workshop is to explore the ways that contemporary labour movements have engaged strategically with law as a means to realise legal and political demands. This workshop aims to bring together the insights about legal mobilisation as a tool of struggle in socio-legal scholarship with contemporary labour’s specific experience of both litigation and legislative practices. This interdisciplinary and collaborative workshop seeks to comprehend the social, political, economic, and legal factors that shape the effectiveness of legal mobilisation and the extent to which it is possible to extract general lessons about the ways labour movements engage strategically with law. While this analysis will involve focusing on the prospects for re-interpreting specific areas of labour law, the workshop is equally concerned with the context of labour’s engagement with law in constitutionalism. This opens up the investigative remit to include the role legal mobilisation plays in giving a voice to worker’s political demands and the potential for these strategic actions to have a longer-term impact on the constitutional protection of labour. 

The official agenda will be available for viewing very soon. 

To register for this event please visit  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/centre-for-law-at-work-workshop-tickets-154690640871 (in person availibility will be limited due to COVID restrictions). 

 

 

15th June 2021

BUIRA History of Industrial Relations Study Group

Has a standard contract of employment ever existed? An historical overview from the UK 

17.00-18.45 Thursday 17 June 2021 (through Zoom) 

The aim of this seminar is to establish the antecedents of casual employment in the history of IR in the light of the Uber case. Many people still see the full-time open-ended employment contract as 'standard', which of course it often is, but the accompanying assumption - that casual employment is somehow anomalous - is clearly misplaced. In this seminar we explore the development of both ‘standard’ and casual employment in a longer-term time frame, going back to the 19th century. 

For further details or to reserve a place, please e-mail Michael Gold (m.gold@rhul.ac.uk) or Linda Clarke (clarkel@wmin.ac.uk). We’ll send you the Zoom link a few days before the seminar. 
Programme:
17.00-17.15: Welcome and introduction: Michael Gold and Linda Clarke (Chairs)

17.15 – 17.45: Simon Deakin

The genealogy of the contract of employment

Legal concepts are linguistic artefacts which have a function (classification for the purposes of legislation and adjudication) and a history (they are shaped by path dependent forces). The English legal term ‘employment’ has a history that helps us to understand the uses it is being put to today. A comparative overview, taking into account mainland European ‘work’ relationships (contrat de travailArbeitsverhältnis) and the US ‘ABC’ test of employment status, are also helpful for putting into perspective recent developments, including the Supreme Court judgment in Uber (Feb. 2021). 

17.45 – 18.15: Noel Whiteside

Back to the Future? Forms of employment in historical perspective

This presentation re-examines assumptions about ‘standard’ employment and its prevalence. Reappraising forms of employment found in the UK since the late nineteenth century, it demonstrates how casual working practices and flexible hours characterised substantial sections of the UK economy prior to the second world. From this perspective, the 1950s and 1960s appear exceptional. The presentation concludes, with recent legal judgements, that work contracts do not necessarily reflect the realities of precarious employment; that security of job tenure does not equate to security of earnings; that official categories of labour market analysis are, at best, misleading - and that multiple problems face those who would reform the situation. For finally, what does ‘employment’ mean? 

18.15 – 18.45: Discussion and Close

*****

Our speakers:

Simon Deakin: Professor of Law at Cambridge University and Director of the Centre for Business Research (www.cbr.cam.ac.uk). He is co-author of Deakin and Morris on Labour Law which will appear in a new edition (the 7th) in the summer of 2021 (https://bloomsburyprofessional.com/uk/deakin-and-morris-labour-law-9781509943548/).

Recent publications include: ‘Decoding employment status’ (2020) King’s Law Journal 31:2, 180-193, https://doi.org/10.1080/09615768.2020.1789432 

Noel Whiteside: Professor at the University of Warwick Institute for Employment Research, an emerita Professor in sociology (Warwick) and a visiting Professor at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment (University of Oxford). Her research focuses on labour markets and labour market policies in historical and comparative perspective, previously assisted by a variety of European and UK research awards. Recent publications include: ‘Casual employment and its consequences: an historical appraisal of recent labour market trends’ Historical Studies in Industrial Relations, 40, 2019: 1-26.

15th June 2021

PhD Scholarship Work & Employment Studies - Kemmy Business School, University of Limerick

Applications are invited for a full-time 4-year PhD scholarship commencing Sep/Oct 2021 in work and employment studies, to be supervised by Professor Tony Dundon. Areas of interest may include but not limited to:
  *   voice for freelance workers;
  *   employment in the gig-economy;
  *   trade union education and adult learning;
  *   work using digital labour platforms;
Applications are invited from candidates with Degrees / Master’s degrees that have a knowledge base in industrial relations, labour process, sociology of work, labour law, heterodox economics, critical management, human resources, social psychology, and/or employment regulation.
 
Funding information:
The studentship is for 4 year and will cover EU level fees and a stipend of €18,500 per annum. Scholarship holders are expected to undertake a limited amount of formative academic duties in addition to pursuing their doctoral studies.
 
Application Procedure:
Applicants should ideally hold a minimum 2.1 first degree and preferably a Masters qualification in a relevant discipline area and have a strong interest in the areas of work and employment studies.
 
Applicants should submit the following:
  *   A completed application form (downloaded here 
  *   A covering letter which includes a personal statement
  *   A 3000 word research proposal following the KBS structure and sequence guidelines, fully addressing each of the headings  (available here)
  *   A full CV, including the names and addresses of two referees.
  *   Application documents should be sent by email to: Rebecca Gachet, Kemmy Business School, rebecca.gachet@ul.ie
 
Shortlisted candidates may be invited to interview.
 
Closing date:
Closing date for receipt of applications is 5pm on Friday, 30th July 2021.
 
Inquiries:
Informal inquires may be made to Professor Tony Dundon (tony.dundon@ul.ie)

15th June 2021

Critique of Scottish Government’s ‘Fair Work’ policy published

The Jimmy Reid Foundation's new paper critiquing the Scottish Government's 'Fair Work' is now available at

https://reidfoundation.scot/2021/06/critique-of-scottish-governments-fair-work-policy-published/

 

A summary of the paper is:

‘Fair Work’ has been the flagship programme of the SNP Scottish Government on employment matters since 2016. The accompanying ‘Fair Work Framework’ sets out to make Scotland a ‘fair work’ nation by 2025 so the new Scottish Parliament elected on 6 May 2021 will take responsibility for that as it runs until 2026. And, it is the SNP minority government in particular that will be measured against this goal. The findings of this paper are that the measures taken to make progress towards attaining this goal are weak and limited because there is no compulsion placed upon employers to implement them; that the rhetoric of SNP Scottish Government of 2016-2021 is not matched by its actions; and that it is improbable that the goal will be reached without significant changes in approach, specifically requiring the use of statutory compulsion, especially in regard of public procurement. Within the conclusion, a number of recommendations are made to address and ameliorate these issues.

 

 

 

8th June 2021

Digit Summer School 2021

The application deadline for the Digit Summer School has been extended until 15 June 2021

The Digit Summer School on Global Value Chains & Digit Transformations is open to Early Career Researchers (ECRs), who we define as individuals that are currently undertaking a PhD or working in a postdoctoral researcher capacity, and are within 5 years of submitting their PhD.

The theme for Digit’s 2021 Summer School reflects the way that digital transformations are changing the organisation, quality and location of work along Global Value chains.

The school will have four parallel tracks:

·         Digital transformation in Global Value Chains and future skill needs

·         The Changing Nature and Location of Work along Global Value Chains

·         Digital Transformation for organisations and the wider society

·         Emerging entrepreneurship through evolving Digital infrastructures for GVCs

 

Applicants should submit a 1000 word abstract by 15 June 2021. All details can be found on the Digit Summer School webpage.

·         Deadline for 1000 word abstract submission: extended to 15/06/2021

·         Notification of abstract acceptance and invitation to submit full paper: 30/06/2021

·         Deadline for full paper submission: 31/08/2021

 

This year’s School will be held online on 14th, 15th & 16th September 2021.

Please do share with anyone you think would be interested and eligible.

 

 

 

Digital Futures at Work Research Centre 
University of Sussex Business School
Jubilee 301
University of Sussex
Brighton
BN1 9SL
United Kingdom

Website: https://digit-research.org/

Twitter: @digitcentre

YouTube

 

SoundCloud

8th June 2021

BUIRA 2021 Online Conference: The past, present and future of industrial relations and the politics of work

Dear BUIRA members,

Please register for the FREE online BUIRA annual conference 2021 (13 - 15 July 2021):

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-conference-2021-tickets-158582643957

BUIRA 2021 Online Conference: The past, present and future of industrial relations and the politics of work

About this event

BUIRA turning 70 last year presents a good opportunity to reflect on the past, present and future of industrial relations. This was the topic of the postponed 2020 conference, and, if anything, is more salient than ever. Despite facing recent challenges, the field of industrial relations continues to be a vital topic of academic and practitioner enquiry. Issues that have long been central within the study of industrial relations, such as pay, collective bargaining, rights at work, employee representation, national and transnational forms of regulation, health and safety, job (in)security, precarity, equality and diversity, and workplace conflict are highly prominent within many current political and academic debates. Understanding the politics of work, grounded in a critical social science tradition, is crucial for academics and policy makers alike.

Where are we now? How have we got here, and what should the future of the field look like? Reflecting on historical developments in industrial relations is crucial in order to ground and contextualise current developments in the world of work. History matters in helping us to understand the changing nature of industrial relations, and yet is often overlooked in modern accounts of work relations. It is also important to reflect on pressing current issues. Most notably, what has/will continue to be the implications of Coronavirus for employment relations and the future of work? This was the subject of the BUIRA Special Seminar on November 4th 2020, and an ongoing research issue for BUIRA members. What about the continuing impact of austerity and the 2008 financial crisis in a more financialised world, increasing inequality, as well as economic and social challenges caused by the Covid pandemic and Brexit? What have been the consequences for public sector industrial relations? What is the impact of patterns of precarious work and non-standard employment relationships on the changing nature of work and employment, skills and the quality of work? Across all of these questions, issues of social class, equality and diversity remain more relevant than ever before. Looking to the future, one key question concerns the extent to which unions can play an active role with social movements to tackle climate breakdown. How is power deployed and distributed at work? How much voice and influence do employees have? Whither economic and industrial democracy at work?

Plenary Speakers:

Judy Wajcman http://www.lse.ac.uk/sociology/people/judy-wajcman
Anne McBride https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/a.mcbride.html
Jenny K Rodriguez https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/jenny.rodriguez.html
Sian Moore https://www.gre.ac.uk/people/rep/faculty-of-business/sian-moore

The conference will also feature an 'Early Career Researcher Plenary Panel' (with Jean Jenkins as Discussant) and a 'Work in the Real World' Special Session with the Manchester Trades Union Council.

We look forward to welcoming you to our FREE online conference. All we ask is that you ensure your BUIRA membership is up-to-date before registering (https://buira.org/membership/join). If you have any questions, please get in touch: admin@buira.org.

The full conference programme will be published shortly.

8th June 2021

BUIRA Executive Committee Elections

The BUIRA Executive Committee will have 2 vacancies as from July 2021. We will be announcing the results of these elections at a forthcoming online Annual General Meeting to be held in 7th July 2021.

As agreed at the AGM in Leeds 2016, the voting system for vacancies on the Executive Committee will be conducted differently.

We now invite all members to forward their interest in becoming a member of the BUIRA Exec Committee to the BUIRA Stewards. Please complete your nomination form here: https://bham.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_8unplDT687Cc9QG  

All members are welcome to apply regardless of career stage (i.e. early career or otherwise). However, we would strongly encourage women and black and minority ethnic members to apply for these positions, as they remain to be under-represented in BUIRA. Following the motion passed at the 2019 AGM in Newcastle, to ensure the Executive Committee has an equal gender balance, only one of the vacant positions can be filled by an individual identifying as male.

Due to the lack of a physical conference this year, we are conducting the voting online through Qualtrics. The selection process is still via the membership, not the Stewardship or the Executive Committee. The results will be announced at the Online AGM.

On the application form, you must include a short biography of no more than 300 words and your reasons for applying for the vacant position.

Please submit your application by Friday 11th June 2021.

27th May 2021

Draft BUIRA Code of Practice – Comments required

At the 2020 BUIRA AGM, it was agreed to hold a special session to discuss the draft BUIRA Code of Practice. This document was prepared by Laura William and Jenny Rodriquez and discussed at previous BUIRA meetings in 2018, 2019 and 2020.

 

The draft is available for comment here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1poIpyJEfq1HMOXRDlzCBK00ZW_z55tTu6EkJ2HOLDOg/edit?usp=sharing 

Please make all comments by Friday 11th June.

 

There will be a special session to gain more feedback and agree the document on Tuesday 15th June 2pm-3pm. Register for this event here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/buira-code-of-practice-discussion-event-tickets-157068878243

 

27th May 2021

William Arthur (Willy) Brown, 22 April 1945 – 1 August 2019

It is with great sadness that we convey the news that Emeritus Professor Willy Brown passed away unexpectedly on Thursday evening at his home near Cambridge.

 

Willy’s achievements in the industrial relations and labour economics fields were exceptional. For many decades Willy was an eminent scholar in these fields, not only in the United Kingdom but also internationally. He was arguably one of the most influential academics of his generation in both research and policy formulation. 

 

Willy was Emeritus Master of Darwin College and Emeritus Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Cambridge. He was previously the Director of the Industrial Relations Research Unit at the University of Warwick, which gained an international reputation for excellence and influence under his leadership, before becoming the Montague Burton Professor of Industrial Relations at the University of Cambridge from 1985 to his retirement in 2012. 

 

Willy provided academic leadership through various senior administrative roles at Cambridge. He also served as President of the British Universities Industrial Relations Association from 1986 to 1989 and as a member of the Executive of the International Labour and Employment Relations Association (formerly the International Industrial Relations Association) from 1989 to 1995.

 

Willy held a number of significant government appointments in the UK including foundation member of the Low Pay Commission from 1997-2007 and as a senior member of the Advisory Conciliation and Arbitration Service Council and Panel of Arbitrators.

 

Willy was the author of many seminal journal articles and books including Piecework Bargaining (1973), The Changing Contours of British Industrial Relations (1981), The Evolution of the Modern Workplace (2009) and The Emerging Industrial Relations of China (2017). In 2002 he was made Commander of the British Empire for services to employment relations.

 

Willy was an Honorary Professor at Renmin University in Beijing and was instrumental in bringing together international and Chinese scholars to examine developments in Chinese employment relations. In 2015 he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Sydney in recognition of his significant contributions to industrial relations scholarship and policy in Australia and internationally.

 

Notwithstanding Willy’s considerable academic accomplishments, his greatest impact may have been through his personal connections and friendships. Willy strived to make the world not only a better place but also a fairer place. In this respect he lived by example. Willy was a truly magnificent person with a unique capacity to speak with anyone on equal terms. He was so selfless, so humble, so generous, and so kind. Willy was greatly loved and will be sorely missed.

 

- Willy’s former doctoral students

 

4th August 2019

Change in BUIRA Stewardship Team

Following a successful conference hosted at Newcastle University, we're pleased to announce that a team from the University of Birmingham have become the BUIRA Stewards.

Many thanks to Jo McBride, Ana Lopes, Stewart Johnstone, Stephen Procter and Michael Brooks for their hard work running the association.

 

The Birmingham team is as follows:

Tony Dobbins  – President

David J Bailey – Membership Officer

Genevieve Coderre-LaPalme – Events and Conference Officer

Andy Hodder – Secretary

Paul Lewis – Treasurer

Alex Wood – Communications Officer

 

21st July 2019


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